‘Most distant planet ever discovered’ is so small it is shaped like a hockey stick

Astronomers have used the Hubble Space Telescope to photograph one of the most distant objects ever found outside our solar system. The tiny exoplanet, called Kepler-452b, was discovered last year and reveals the first chemical traces of a planet in our Milky Way Galaxy. It’s the most distant planet that’s ever been seen.

The newfound world— which is only 50% the size of Jupiter and orbits about 10 million light-years away—was discovered in November, 2016, in a new region of space where it’s always day. Yet it has a single core, which suggests that the planet is hot like Jupiter but has liquid water to warm up the planet.

Kepler-452b looks like some kind of hockey stick as it orbits its own sun, which is only about 1.6 million years old. Its star is the farthest one known to have a host star that hasn’t been rocked by the Big Bang. In addition to its rocky gravity and steady day, the planet is thin, meaning that more than half of its mass is in heat, instead of the usual 30% of a planet’s mass in a gas shell.

Check out the photos taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, and the new scientific paper detailing the find, below.

Hubble Telescope

Galaxy Magazine

Galaxy Magazine

Galaxy Magazine

Galaxy Magazine

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